Drew Lynch-Dismiss Your Disability and Create a Positive!

Drew LynchDrew Lynch is the young, 20 something comedian who hit it big on the talent show, “America’s Got Talent”, with his incredibly inspiring personal story of how to dismiss your disability and create a positive, and with his truly humorous comedy act. Drew Lynch has a story that could have been tragic, but he found a way and a will to make sure it wasn’t. Instead of focusing on a changed ability, and giving up on his dreams, he used his strong ability to make people laugh and creates a joyous and successful life for himself. That is what it is to dismiss your disability and create a positive.

According to his website, he was hit in the throat by a softball at the age of 20 years old. The damage created by this impact was to his vocal cords and it caused Drew to have a stutter. Where once he was aspiring to be a successful actor, and per his own words, on television, the guy he used to be would not have spent time with the guy he is now, he went through many life changes that only some of us might be able to understand.

Drew Lynch is not alone in his journey. So many people have an ability that has been taken from them, due to medical illness, injury or trauma. If it were more acceptable in society to be unique and different, these injured abilities would not be referred to as a disability with the same connotation that they dream up for us in our current day. Whether it is the inability to hear, or see, or walk, or talk, or to travel, or to go in an airplane, to swim in the ocean, to focus on our work, or any other ability that is not necessarily like others, what we call a disability, is an opportunity to reach bigger and higher and it is individuals like Drew who help to inspire us to do so.

At times, Drew performs with Samuel J. Comroe, a fellow comedian who has had Tourette’s all of his life. Together they make people laugh, they inspire and help to show them a positive slant to all that happens in life.   This is true art and talent and leadership on their parts.

Additionally, it is often said that someone who cannot hear or cannot see, has heightened abilities in other areas. Scientific American published an article on this exact subject. In their report they referred to The Journal of Neuroscience and a study that was done that shows that there is “mounting evidence that people missing one sense don’t just learn to use the others better. The brain adapts to the loss by giving itself a makeover. If one sense is lost, the areas of the brain normally devoted to handling that sensory information do not go unused—They get rewired and put to work processing other senses.”

Perhaps we each have stronger abilities in one area because of a lesser ability in other areas. We do have the choice to use our stronger abilities for the good of many, including ourselves.

Too often, the American public and in fact the public, worldwide, are told that an ability that doesn’t function like others, a disability, is a mental health or behavioral health problem that can only be treated by pharmaceuticals. How untrue this is and in each of our own way, we can take a page from the book of these two young men and many other heroic athletes, performers and individuals who go beyond the expectations of the mental health community and take charge of their lives.

Easier said then done! To dismiss your disability and create a positive! This is the genuine challenge each of us has. Imagine the possibility of first, working with a qualified medical professional to accurately and precisely discover the potential physical cause of your unwanted condition, your disability, and then working with the traditional, non mental health professional, to treat that physical ailment to create a marked improvement in life. Then, to look at your strengths, the abilities you excel at, that bring joy to others, and to use that ability for good. Such as Drew Lynch has done! This is the challenge we all face and with help perhaps the more individuals who choose to do this, the more we can help each other to succeed at it.

 

Sources: http://preferredparkingcomedytour.com

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5nMb4_ghvg

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/superpowers-for-the-blind-and-deaf/